MVPITPro Podcast – Ep5 – A Talk with Mike Bender from the Azure Cloud Ops Advocate Team

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Join us for episode 5 of the new MVPIT Pro Podcast, featuring your hosts Andy Syrewicze from Altaro Software and myself 

Join Andy and Rob as they talk about the world of IT, Microsoft, and the Microsoft MVP program!

In this episode Andy and Rob Talk about:

  • Windows Server 2019 GA Release
  • What is Cloud Ops Advocate?
  • and much, much more!

Our special guest interview this episode features Mike Bender @michaelbender – Cloud Ops Advocate Team at Microsoft!

Enjoy 🙂 !!!

MVP ITPro Podcast – Ep3 – A Talk with PowerShell Creator Jeffrey Snover

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Join us for episode 3 of the new MVPIT Pro Podcast, featuring your hosts Andy Syrewicze from Altaro Software and myself    Jeffrey Snover @jsnover 

In this episode Andy and Rob Talk about:

  • Windows Server 2019 TP Build 17666
  • GDPR
  • Microsoft Loves Linux!
  • Steps that IT Pros can take today to become Microsoft MVPs
  • and much, much more!

Our special guest interview this episode features The one and only Jeffrey Snover, Microsoft Technical Fellow and Creator of PowerShell!

Enjoy 🙂 !!!

Not all APIs are Created Equal – Overview – Part 1

To continue on from my last post on API’s and their Business Value I did a few years ago.  I thought I would write an updated post on API’s (Application Programmer Interfaces) do a little deep dive. APIs have had a big impact on my last role and bigger impact on my current role as a PM @ 5nine Software, and thought I would share my knowledge and research so far. APIs are not scary 🙂 Continue reading

Hyper-V Management: 9 Tips Every Hyper-V Admin Should Remember

Opinions are various and abundant on how to best configure and manage Hyper-V. Much of the advice seems to be confusing, and some if it downright contradictory. One reason for such confusion is that some articles are obviously written under the assumption that VMWare best practices apply equally well to Hyper-V. The other, more common cause of this contradictory information is that best practices for Hyper-V vary considerably, depending on whether you’re managing a Hyper-V cluster. Continue reading

Nano Server…Revealed

Nano Server

Nano Server

At Microsoft Ignite, I had a chance to meet and talk with Jeff Snover…a great honor…and his latest project “Windows Nano Server” is very cool.  Windows Nano Server is designed to be as lightweight and compact as possible. ‘Nano Server is a deeply refactoring version of Windows Server with a small footprint and remotely managed installation, optimised for the cloud and a DevOps workflow,‘ as quoted by Jeffrey Snover, Andrew Mason and Alan Back in a joint blog post. ‘It is designed for fewer patch and update events, faster restarts, better resource utilization and tighter security.

The result: as compared to the equivalent Windows Server build, Nano Server offers a 93 percent reduction in storage requirements, 92 percent fewer critical security bulletins, and 80 percent fewer reboots during operation. This is great for Security and Network Admins….I spent a lot of nights during my times as a network admin around patching and worry about what might blow up and this is a welcome change, especially for a Hyper-V environment 😉  Go Microsoft…
Nano Server
Naturally, those benefits come at a cost. ‘To achieve these benefits, we removed the GUI stack, 32 bit support (WOW64), MSI and a number of default Server Core components,‘ the team explained. ‘There is no local logon or Remote Desktop support. All management is performed remotely via WMI and PowerShell. We are also adding Windows Server Roles and Features using Features on Demand and DISM.‘ Despite this, Nano Server remains API-compatible with other Windows Server variants – meaning it should, in theory, be relatively straightforward to port applications across to the platform.

Also, It ships with the baseline version of .NET called CoreCLR, which Microsoft in recent months made open source. The OS does not contain the binaries or metadata that typically increase the footprint and developers are expected to package applications along with dependencies in a single unit of deployment.
Core PowerShell, a minimalistic version of PowerShell refactored to run on CoreCLR, provides Remote management capabilities and Nano Server can be installed on physical hardware or virtualized infrastructure.

When Windows Server starts supporting Docker, Nano Server stands to become the become the preferred OS to run containers.
Nano Server
Windows Nano Server won’t be for everyone. Microsoft has indicated that it is targeting two prime markets for the new OS: cloud applications, which includes the ability to run multiple languages and runtimes in containers, virtual machines or physical servers; and of course its own Cloud Platform infrastructure, with support for Hyper-V compute clusters and Scale-out File Server storage clusters. It’s in virtualization where the biggest benefits will be found: with each virtual machine requiring only seven percent the storage space of previous Windows Server instances and consuming considerably fewer resources while running, the overhead of running a virtualized infrastructure is considerably lessened.

Flexibility is key to delivering a modern data center, and by using the combination of Nano Server and its new container technology Microsoft is making a big shift away from its previous monolithic server model to one that’s more aligned with the way we deliver cloud-scale services. That does mean that Nano Server won’t be for everyone. Customers are going to have to have made the shift to a DevOps model, and to using cloud-scale data center infrastructure practices of which I am a big believer in and frankly why I work for Nutanix.

Microsoft has not yet offered a release date or licensing information for Windows Nano Server. Beta bits are available via MSDN on the Windows Server Technical Preview 2 media. Instructions can be found here to get started, if you want to check it out.
In conclusion, with Nano Server, Microsoft stands a chance to blow them all out the water with keeping Windows relevant in the era of linux, containers and microservices.

Until next time, Rob…