Microsoft Azure Cloud Series – What is Cloud? – Part 1

Hi All, its Rob again and I decided to write a series on Azure Cloud.  Since Azure Stack is months away from GA, its good to understand Azure Cloud for a few reasons.  The API is the consistent across Azure Cloud and Azure Stack. And building a hybrid environment is the future for IT to use features like DR, Application Portability and Backup.

So, let’s start from the beginning and go over the fundamental terms.

What is Cloud? Simply put, it’s a large number of devices connected through wide communication network.

What are the benefits of Cloud?

  • Provide Services at much lower cost
  • Flexibility on technology that gives the customer a competitive advantage
  • Helps IT to be more efficient on operations
  • Pays as they go and for what they use
  • Move to OPEX model from CAPEX model
  • Faster deployment

Types of Clouds and Examples

Private

  • A private cloud is dedicated to the customer’s organization.
  • On-premises (their own data center) or in a partner’s hosting facility.
  • More control over the level of security, privacy, customization, and governance of your software and services.
  • More cost-effective data center operations using the customer’s existing investments in people and equipment.
  • Example: Customer needs dedicated resources and wants to restrict access to all content in the cloud

Public

  • The public cloud is where cloud services are provided in a virtualized environment.
  • Resources are available on demand.
  • Centralized operation and resource management are shared.
  • Customers can access the resource they need, and then only pay for what they use.
  • Many services are available that are ready to be accessed from any internet enabled device.
  • Example: Customer can share resources and wants to pay when they use the resource

Hybrid

  • A hybrid cloud is an integrated service utilizing on-premises resources, private clouds and public clouds.
  • Moving non-sensitive functions to the public cloud allows an organization to benefit from public cloud scalability while reducing the demands on a private cloud.
  • The availability of secure resources and scalable cost-effective public resources provides organizations with options.
  • Example: Customer has secure and non-secure data and they have made some investment in their own infrastructure and they want to use them

Industry Tends

Industrytrendsazure Cloud

As we look at the IT industry today, a number of important trends are changing the way software is being purchased, deployed and used in the organization.

Data Explosion

The volume of data in the workplace is exploding. According to IDC, digital data will grow more than 40x over the next decade. As more and more data is created digitally, we expect to see ever greater demands being placed on our data platforms to store, secure, process and manage these large volumes of data.

Consumerization of IT

Today we see an increasing trend toward the “consumerization” of IT—creating the demand for Web 2.0 experiences in the business environment. As consumers, we are accustomed to powerful user-friendly experiences, whether searching the Internet on a mobile device to find information instantly, or quickly accessing our personal financial data. In the workplace, however, we are often unable to answer even the most basic questions about our business. Increasingly, users demand business experiences that more closely mirror the convenience and ease of use in consumer life.

Private and Public Cloud

Cloud computing is changing the way data is accessed and processed, and it is creating whole new models for the way applications are delivered. According to IDC, Cloud services will account for 46% of net-new growth in overall IT spending. With private and public cloud infrastructure, organizations have an opportunity to reduce TCO dramatically as data volume increases. As we see an evolution toward greater use of private and public clouds, we see an increasing need for solutions that support hybrid cloud scenarios.

Azure at a Glance

azure-overview Cloud

So this picture, or at least the big blocks above, are how Microsoft thinks about the main capability buckets of their platform. As we go though this series, we will start to get more specific about these buckets (Compute, data, networks, and app services).

Well, I hope you enjoyed this brief introduction on Azure Cloud.  Stay tuned to the rest of the series. Next up, more fundamentals and use cases and then we dive into some fundamentals, like Azure Resource Manager.  Until next time, Rob

NPP Training series – How does it work – CVM – Software Defined

To continue NPP training series here is my next topic:  How does it work – CVM – Software Defined

If you missed other parts of my series, check out links below:
Part 1 – NPP Training series – Nutanix Terminology
Part 2 – NPP Training series – Nutanix Terminology
Cluster Architecture with Hyper-V

Data Structure on Nutanix with Hyper-V
I/O Path Overview
Drive Breakdown

To give credit, most of the content was taken from Steve Poitras’s “Nutanix Bible” blog as his content is the most accurate and then I put a Hyper-V lean to it. Also, he just rocks…other than being a Sea Hawks Fan :).

Software-Defined
Nutanix CVM

As mentioned before (likely numerous times), the Nutanix platform is a software-based solution which ships as a bundled software + hardware appliance.  The controller VM or what we call the Nutanix CVM is where the vast majority of the Nutanix software and logic sits and was designed from the beginning to be an extensible and pluggable architecture. A key benefit to being software-defined and not relying upon any hardware offloads or constructs is around extensibility.  As with any product life cycle, advancements and new features will always be introduced.

By not relying on any custom ASIC/FPGA or hardware capabilities, Nutanix can develop and deploy these new features through a simple software update.  This means that the deployment of a new feature (e.g., deduplication) can be deployed by upgrading the current version of the Nutanix software.  This also allows newer generation features to be deployed on legacy hardware models. For example, say you’re running a workload running an older version of Nutanix software on a prior generation hardware platform (e.g., 2400).  The running software version doesn’t provide deduplication capabilities which your workload could benefit greatly from.  To get these features, you perform a rolling upgrade of the Nutanix software version while the workload is running, and you now have deduplication.  It’s really that easy.

Similar to features, the ability to create new “adapters” or interfaces into Distributed Storage Fabric is another key capability.  When the product first shipped, it solely supported iSCSI for I/O from the hypervisor, this has now grown to include NFS and SMB for Hyper-V.  In the future, there is the ability to create new adapters for various workloads and hypervisors (HDFS, etc.).  And again, all of this can be deployed via a software update. This is contrary to most legacy infrastructures, where a hardware upgrade or software purchase is normally required to get the “latest and greatest” features.  With Nutanix, it’s different. Since all features are deployed in software, they can run on any hardware platform, any hypervisor, and be deployed through simple software upgrades.

The following figure shows a logical representation of what this software-defined controller framework (Nutanix CVM) looks like:Nutanix CVMNext up, NPP Training Series – How does it all work – Disk Balancing